Balancing Multiple Freelance Skills in One Business

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Let’s talk about balancing multiple freelance skills in one business. Perhaps you started off your business by branding yourself with one particular freelance skill set but you've been asked to jump in and do other types of projects or you're looking for ways to expand your income.

Although I'm primarily a freelance writer, I've also done work as a virtual assistant, project manager, and editor. You'll find people who have all sorts of different freelance skill sets under one umbrella. It just depends on what the market needs as well as what you want to do. There may be certain types of jobs that you gravitate towards.


Marketing Multiple Freelance Skills

You will need to adjust to your marketing to reflect that you have multiple skills under one business name. You're going to want to communicate with your ideal clients directly and you may need to set up multiple websites or many sites to reflect that.

For example, I have a website that's dedicated specifically to the content work that I do for attorneys and law firms because that's such a huge part of my freelance business. But I'll occasionally use my LinkedIn profile and my Upwork profile to promote other parts of my freelancing business.

The truth is that you can have multiple skills that you're positioning, but you've got to have samples for each of those skills. I need to have a writing sample, an editing sample, and testimonials to back me up as a project manager.
 

Managing Your Time with Multiple Freelance Skills

You're also going to want to figure out how you're going to divide your time with marketing as well as delivering end products, so you might need to adjust your schedule. Maybe on certain days of the week, you focus on marketing and pitching on a variety of jobs.

Usually, you'll hear me say, don't change lanes too often, don't ask your brain to do too many different things. But if you're doing these freelance skill sets in different parts of the day, like you're writing in the morning and you're editing in the afternoon or VA work in the morning and writing in the afternoon, you're still giving enough focused time on those very particular projects to make sure that you are bringing the most detail-oriented eyes to the table on behalf of your clients.

 

Look for Complementary Freelance Skills

When you're thinking about how to adjust your freelance business and accommodate for these new skills that you hope to incorporate, you want to think specifically about the best way to do that and what skills are most complementary to what you already do.

When you can find skills that are complementary, you are not asking too much of your brain to do different types of projects all the time. They're related and similar and it's much easier to position yourself when marketing.  

For example, it might be hard to position yourself as a web developer and a voice-over artist in the same business, since these are not complementary skills. You might need to market those two businesses very differently.

On the other hand, if you are a freelance writer, it makes sense to incorporate editing into your existing service offerings. You already have a way with words, and you already edit your own work. It's a natural complement.

Virtual assistants can sometimes do writing work and vice versa.

Perhaps you really love designing websites and you have some graphic design skills on the side.

These are all complementary skill sets that you can offer as a freelancer.

If you're doing complementary skills as a virtual assistant and online business manager, you can pitch yourself differently but talk generally about those underlying benefits that you provide to clients: keeping them organized, taking things off their plate, scheduling and managing marketing campaigns and team members, etc.

 

If you're thinking about adding a new skill to your freelance business, subscribe to my YouTube channel, Freelance Freedom.